GI SPORE

Principal Investigator: Patricia Thompson-Carino, PhD

The goal of the University of Arizona Cancer Center's Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) is to prevent and cure gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. The SPORE approaches this goal through studies in prevention, genetics and therapeutics.

The esophagus, pancreas and colon are some of the organs that make up the body's gastrointestinal tract. Cancers of these organs often carry a poor prognosis, and as a result, these cancers are responsible for more than 17 percent of cancer deaths in the United States. Laboratory and clinical research associated with the University of Arizona Cancer Center's GI SPORE focuses on addressing this poor survivability (which is linked to delayed detection of the cancers) and ultimately reducing the incidence and mortality of GI cancers.

What is SPORE?GI SPORE GoalsProject Descriptions
Core Descriptions • Developmental Research Program Advocacy ProgramsSupplementsCareer DevelopmentFaculty
 

What is SPORE?

In 1992, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) established the Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPOREs) to promote cooperative research and to speed the information exchange between basic and clinical science. Through the SPORE program, laboratory and clinical scientists work together to plan, design and implement research programs that impact on cancer prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment and control. This cooperative exchange supports translational research. In other words, it helps to move basic research discoveries-new ideas that have the potential to reduce cancer incidence and mortality, improve survival, and to improve the quality of life-from the laboratory bench to the patient's bedside. The SPORE program also includes a career development aspect that recruits scientists from within and outside the SPORE institution to enlarge the cadre of laboratory and clinical scientists dedicated to translational research on human cancer. Institutions united by the SPORE program meet annually to share data, assess research progress, identify new research opportunities and establish priorities for research most likely to reduce incidence and mortality and to increase survival. 

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GI SPORE Goals

Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers account for nearly 20 percent of cancer deaths, and colorectal cancer (CRC) continues to be the second leading cause of such deaths, in the USA in 2006. The long-term objective of our SPORE in GI Cancer is to prevent and cure GI cancers. The overall translational goal of our SPORE is to develop novel and more effective approaches to prevention and treatment. To achieve this goal, we propose four Projects, Three cores and Developmental Research and Career Development programs.

Project 1 is entitled Nuclear Receptor Targets for the Prevention of Barrett's Esophagus (BE). The translational objective of this project is to assess the potential benefit of FXR agonist to prevent BE progression to esophageal cancer. 

Project 2 is entitled Metabolic Flux as a Novel Drug Target in Pancreatic Cancer. The translational goal of this project is to demonstrate that the metabolic state of pancreatic cancer influences the response of patient tumor to gemcitabine-based chemotherapy.

Project 3 is entitled Targeting Polyamines and Inflammation in FAP with the translational goal to develop safe and effective pharmaceutical strategies for patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). 

Project 4 is entitled Molecular Landscape of Adolescent and Adult Onset Colorectal Cancer. The translational goal of this project is to characterize the molecular landscape of young-onset sporadic CRC across race/ethnic backgrounds and convert actionable alterations to routine molecular pathology.

The projects are supported by three cores. The Administration and Evaluation Core (Core A) will coordinate all SPORE activities and communication. A Biospecimen and Pathology Resource (Core B) will provide SPORE investigators access to high quality patient biospecimens and expert support for biological measurements. The Biostatistics and Clinical Resource (Core C) will provide expertise and coordination of existing infrastructures for statistics and biomarker development for SPORE investigators including central coordination of clinical and human subject research. The Developmental Research Program will ensure that the most promising translational ideas are nurtured and funded. The Career Development Program will support and mentor physicians and scientists in GI translational research. To achieve our stated goals, this GI SPORE leverages resources across 10 institutions and 5 states in collaboration with several hospitals and companies.

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Project Descriptions


Project 1: Nuclear Receptor Targets for the Prevention of Barrett's Esophagus (BE)

Project Co-Leaders:
Ross Bremner, MD  (Applied Scientist, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center)
Michael Barrett, PhD (Basic Scientist, Translational Genomics Research Institute)

Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has dramatically increased in incidence over the past two decades.  For patients diagnosed with EAC, the prospects are bleak; the current 5-year survival rate has remained at 17% for the past two decades, and new therapeutic strategies are limited.  Barrett’s esophagus (BE), a metaplastic epithelial change resulting from chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and obesity are currently the major risk factors for EAC.  EAC is preceded by development of pre-malignant high-grade dysplasia (HGD) within the BE lesion. Current treatment is focused on detection and removal of HGD using endoscopic procedures, in particular radio-frequency ablation (RFA).  Although these invasive approaches are efficacious, recurrence of BE/HGD, side effects related to endoscopic procedures, financial costs and the necessity for continued endoscopic surveillance, indicate a need for additional treatment approaches to support endoscopic treatments.  Chemopreventive therapies directed at limiting progression of BE to HGD and HGD to EAC would have a significant beneficial impact upon management of BE providing a non-invasive therapy for patients.  The nuclear hormone receptor, Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates bile acid, lipid and glucose metabolism and FXR agonists are in clinical trials for several metabolic/obesity-related disorders.  Significant for BE and EAC, FXR also functions as tumor suppressor and FXR expression is present in BE and reduced in EAC.  Preliminary evidence indicates that FXR agonists reduce the growth of neoplastic cells, suggesting that a FXR agonist could function as a chemopreventive agent for BE, with the additional benefits of symptom control related to an obese state.

Thus the translational goal of this proposal is to evaluate a well-tolerated FXR agonist [Obeticholic acid (OCA)], currently in clinical trials, as a chemopreventive agent for BE in an early phase, biomarker trial of BE patients. 

The primary hypothesis of this proposal is that targeting of FXR will have substantial benefit in treating and preventing BE progression to EAC.

To test this hypothesis, we have two specific aims: 1) Evaluate the effects and potential chemopreventive properties of OCA upon the pathologic progression of BE to HGD and EAC in a BE transgenic mouse model, and 2) Conduct a single arm Phase II trial to test the effect/s of OCA (25mg/d) given for 8 weeks in BE patients with a maximum diagnosis of HGD. 

Completion of these aims will advance our long-term goal of developing a non-invasive chemopreventive therapy for BE, which will have a positive impact on the health of patients with BE and reduce the cost of EAC to society.  

The successful completion of the proposed studies will provide new knowledge and mechanistic insight on the potential activity of FXR and a FXR agonist in BE and HGD-BE and provide the necessary evidence for future long-term clinical trials for an FXR agonist in controlling progression of BE to EAC.

Project 2: Metabolic Flux as a Novel Drug Target in Pancreatic Cancer

Project Co-Leaders:
Daniel Von Hoff, MD, FACP  (Applied Scientist, Translational Genomics Research Institute)
Emmanuelle Meuillet, PhD (Basic Scientist, University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center)
Natalia A. Ignatenko, PhD (Basic Scientist, University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center)

The major translational goal of our proposed work is to test the observation made in experimental model systems that the metabolic state of pancreatic ductal adenomcarcinomas (PDA) influences the response of tumor to specific anti-metabolite drugs such as metformin (MET).  The hypothesis to be tested in this that MET inhibits K-Ras-dependent cell growth by limiting new FA synthesis in a CHOL dependent fashion such that the efficacy of MET may be enhanced by inhibition of CHOL synthesis with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors or similar lipid lowering agents.  Thus, our overarching hypothesis is that the activity of MET is dependent on the genetic background (e.g., K-Ras status) and on the metabolic state of the tumor.

Two specific aims are proposed to test this hypothesis and they are:
Aim 1: To test novel anti-metabolite therapies for the treatment of PDA.  The transgenic animal model LSLK-RasG12D/+,LSL-Trp53R172H/+,Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) will be given MET alone or in combination with a CHOL lowering drug (Atorvastatin), their circulating and tumor metabolomic fluxes will be compared to control.  Comparative analyses between mouse and human will be conducted to direct screens for anti-metabolite therapies in combination with standard treatment regimens such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel for treatment of PDA.

Aim 2: To determine the metabolic profile of PDA patients in response to MET plus a cholesterol lowering drug compared to an observational cohort using in vivo stable isotope glucose tracer. In a set of pancreatic cancer patients who have progressed on first line therapy before and after intervention, we will conduct comparative analyses of metabolite fluxes using the SiDMAP platform and Targeted Tracer Fate Association (TTFA) and molecular alterations determined by RNAseq. 

Impact: A significant contribution of our efforts will be to identify early biomarker in human PDA and to determine if the metabolic state of the tumor determines response to MET, either independent of/or in the context of the genomic landscape. Positive findings on the PDA metabolomics fluxes in humans will advance the discovery of novel anti-metabolite/chemotherapy combination strategies for the treatment of PDA.

The project aims at identifying novel biomarker in patients afflicted with pancreatic cancer.  Using an innovative approach, an anti-metabolite strategy targeting both fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis will be tested in animal models as well as in a clinical trial, for patients who have progressed on first line therapy. 

Project 3: Targeting Polyamines and Inflammation in FAP

Project Co-Leaders:
Steven H. Erdman, MD (Applied Scientist, Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital)
Eugene W. Gerner, PhD (Basic Scientist, University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center)
Patricia Thompson-Carino, PhD (Basic Scientist, University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center)

The translational goal of this project is to develop safe and effective drug therapies that address current unmet medical needs in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP).

We previously showed that the inhibition of polyamine synthesis and inflammation prevents colorectal neoplasia in animals and in humans. Recently, we made the novel discovery that inhibition of polyamine synthesis in the ApcMin/+ mouse, a model of FAP, inhibits thymic atrophy and other measures of immune disturbance that occur with tumor development. We also discovered that the sulfone metabolite of sulindac (Exisulind) when used in combination with polyamine inhibition to prevent colorectal neoplasia, acts in a non-COX2 dependent fashion to enhance regulatory T cells that inhibit the pro-inflammatory (pro-tumorigenic) cytokine IL-17 through a PPARγ-dependent mechanism.

Here we will test the novel hypothesis that drugs that inhibit the polyamine pathway prevent tumor-induced de-regulation of immune cells in colorectal tumorigenesis as a major mechanism of their anti-tumor activity. 

Two specific aims are proposed. Specific Aim 1 will investigate the effects of agents targeting the polyamine pathways on host immune monitoring of neoplasia (referred to here as “immunosurveillance”) and immune evasion mechanisms employed by neoplastic cells and tissues, using genetically modified  mouse models (e.g. ApcMin/+ mouse for FAP) and sporadic (e.g. azoxymethane-treated AJ mice) CRC. Specific Aim 2a will validate tissue, blood and urinary biomarkers of host immunity, inflammation and agent action as predictors of treatment-associated efficacy and toxicities in pre- and/or post-surgical adult FAP patients treated with the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) inhibitor difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac. Specific Aim 2b will assess the efficacy of the DFMO and sulindac combination and the relationship between these immune modulation markers and treatment safety in a phase I/II clinical trial in children ages 7-18 years with genotypic FAP. 

The long-term goal of this project is to deliver safe and effective pharmaceutical combinations as adjuvant treatments for FAP patients. Demonstration that the anti-tumor activity of these drugs is mediated by effects on host immunity would offer new opportunities for immune-based CRC chemoprevention efforts.

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited syndrome associated with high risk of colorectal and other cancers. Lack of an effective pharmaceutical therapy is a major unmet medical need in FAP. Results from the proposed studies could have broad applications for sporadic forms of colorectal and other cancers.

Project 4: Molecular Landscape of Adolescent and Adult Onset Colorectal Cancer

Project Co-Leaders:
Scott Kopetz, MD (Applied Scientist, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)
Stanley Hamilton, MD  (Applied Scientist, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)
Mark Nelson, PhD (Basic Scientist, University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center)

The incidence of colorectal cancer in adolescent and young adults (AYA, ages 20-39 years old), particularly cancer of the distal colon and rectum, has increased over the past decade. While limited to small numbers, tumors arising in the AYA population have distinct features with late stage at diagnosis and worse overall survival being among the most concerning. Thus, despite the significance of the AYA population to society and concerns about poor participation in clinical trials, there have been no large scale efforts directed at understanding the molecular landscape of colorectal cancer in this population. This limits prognostication and treatment in AYA patients to knowledge based on a disease that occurs in older individuals. In the proposed study, we will conduct comprehensive molecular profiling of sporadic AYA microsatellite-stable or low CRC in fresh frozen tissues and apply a novel 'integromics' approach across a diverse patient population.

The translational goal is to convert recurring alterations (>1%) in these tumors into a higher throughput set of tests for application in routine formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue to a) estimate the prevalence of AYA-associated molecular alterations across a larger patient series from multiple centers, and b) develop prototype assay panels for molecular diagnostics to support tailored management of AYA patients.

Our study hypothesis is that sporadic CRC in the AYA population is enriched for molecular alterations (i.e. specific driver mutations genomic events and/or epigenetic alterations) relative to sporadic CRC arising in older patients.

To test this hypothesis, we propose three specific aims: 1) to compare the molecular landscape of 75 fresh frozen tumors of sporadic AYA CRC cases to a similarly characterized set of cases in a comparison population (≥ 65 years old, n=100), 2) to develop and validate a low-cost, panel-based platform(s) to accurately detect AYA-CRC enriched or unique molecular or protein alterations in routine FFPE samples for routine clinical use and 3) to estimate the frequency of AYA CRC subsets across age groups, race/ethnicity, and socially diverse populations, and apply FFPE-based testing of recurrent molecular or protein events in AYA CRC in a large ethnically and socially diverse set of CRC patients. 

A major impact of this study will be characterization of the largest set of sporadic AYA CRC tumors at the molecular level across diverse race/ethnic and social economic status.  Secondarily, this would include the largest systematic analysis of the molecular landscape of signet-ring cell histopathology in young patients.   

Currently, because of their rarity, colorectal cancer in adolescent and young adults (AYA) comprise a major understudied cancer for which, other than largely anecdotal findings, little is known in terms of biology including the molecular landscape of the presenting disease (i.e., major driver events and treatment targets).  Because the incidence of colorectal cancer is increasing in this population while rates decline in older patients, having societal as well as personal impact, prompt characterization of the molecular landscape of AYA tumors and identification of distinct/enriched molecular drivers is increasingly important in an era of molecular diagnostics and genomic driven treatments.

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Core Descriptions

 

Core A: Evaluation and Administration

Core Leader: Patricia Thompson-Carino, PhD (University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center)

SPORE grants have several unique features that require added attention to evaluation and administration. This particular SPORE comprises four projects, three cores, and two developmental programs across ten institutions. As a multi-institutional, multi-project translational effort, centralized administration and evaluation are critical to the program’s success.
Essential services provided by the ADMIN CORE include:

  • Provide scientific oversight and evaluation through the efforts of the Principal Investigator, Executive Committee, External Advisory Committee and institutional representation.
  • Oversee fiscal management including financial coordination of the nine consortium agreements proposed on this SPORE and budget oversight of all components of the SPORE.
  • Coordinate NIH reporting requirements, including annual progress reports and public access requirements through NCBI.
  • Manage compliance with Conflict of Interest reporting and documentation.
  • Coordinate regular program meetings and project interactions.
  • Coordinate SPORE-related activities among participating institutions, including the proposed InterSPORE AYA Consortium
  • Coordinate all activities related to the Developmental Research and Career Development Programs.
  • Coordinate patient advocate activities.
  • Provide liaison with the External Advisory Committee, and organize regularly scheduled planning and evaluation activities, such as annual scientific review.
  • Arrange cross-institutional monthly meetings discuss scientific progress and present a wide variety of scientific developments in the Gl cancer field.
  • Maintain detailed records on SPORE activities, including meeting minutes and programmatic changes.
  • Coordinate investigator participation in the annual NCI Translational Science meeting and/or other relevant national scientific meetings.

The Administration and Evaluation Core provides a framework for supporting the unique features of the SPORE as well as the administrative tasks associated with a large, diverse, multi-project grant.

Core B: Biospecimen and Pathology Resource

Core Director: Achyut Bhattacharyya, MD (University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center)

The overarching objective of Core B: Biospecimen and Pathology Resource (PATH Core) is to provide SPORE investigators, engaged in translational research, access to a wide variety of human biological specimens related to GI cancers following Institutional Review Board approved protocols. The PATH Core has dedicated personnel, facilities, and experience providing SPORE investigators with annotated high quality biospecimens.  The structure of the PATH Core will take advantage of the histological expertise in GI cancers, the considerable technical infrastructure, staff experience and skill to facilitate the multi-site nature of the proposed Projects. The PATH Core has expertise in procurement, processing, archiving, annotation and the essential informatic organization for all GI SPORE related biological specimens and derivatives to support and manage the need for 'real' and 'virtual' tissue banking across Institutions and Projects. 

Specific Aims. The PATH Core has four primary specific aims:

  1. Provide state-of-the-art searchable inventory of high quality, well-annotated biological specimens specific to cancers arising in the GI tract for use by SPORE investigators and approved users and,
  2. Provide infrastructure (equipment and expertise) to support the precise and sensitive analytical measurement of molecular and protein biomarkers in a variety of biological specimens and,
  3. Provide expert pathological consultation that includes, but is not limited, to histopathological review and evaluation of GI-related cancers, design and conduct of biomarker measurements in human biologics, and oversight of quality control for tissue-related studies and,
  4. Provide multi- and inter- institutional resource support for biospecimen acquisition, biomarker optimization and measurement with informatic preservation.

The Biospecimen and Pathology Resource Core will provide the GI Cancer research community within the GI SPORE Program, at the University of Arizona Cancer Center and its contributing institutions and elsewhere, the ability to apply basic research findings obtained from relevant biospecimens with histological and clinical annotation to the evaluation of human GI cancers. 

Core C: Biostatistics and Clinical Resource

Core Co-Leaders:
Denise Roe, DrPH (University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center)
Hitendra Patel, MD (University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center)

The service goal of the Statistic and Clinical Core (Core C) is to provide study design, database design and management, and statistical analysis support for all SPORE projects In addition, due to the multi-institutional nature of the SPORE, the STAT-CLIN CORE will provide additional administrative infrastructure to support clinical study initiation, monitoring, and reporting. 

The specific aims of the Biostatistics and Clinical Resource Core are:

Aim 1: To provide appropriate experimental design for all laboratory, animal and clinical studies. 
Aim 2: To provide efficient, comprehensive, and secure data management to SPORE projects.
Aim 3: To provide statistical collaboration in the analysis of SPORE studies. 
Aim 4: To provide comprehensive clinical trial resources for study design, IRB and data safety monitoring requirements, and overall clinical oversight. 

The STAT-CLIN Core support activities have been combined into a single core to facilitate interactions among the biostatisticians and clinicians involved in SPORE projects. 

The translational goal is to facilitate integration of project results among the basic science, clinical and biostatistician investigators.

The long-term goal of this Core is to provide SPORE members with high-quality quantitative support, from study design through publication of results.  This extends to the submission of supporting material for regulatory credentialing.

Statistical and quantitative methods are a vital part of the paradigm of translational research.  Statistical and data management personnel provide quantitative assistance in all phases of the translational science enterprise.

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Developmental Research Program

Program Director: Jennifer Barton, PhD

The translational goal of the Developmental Research Program is to provide short-term support for promising research opportunities with a high probability for impact on translational research in GI cancers. The support is specifically targeted for ideas with the potential to develop into full SPORE projects or independently funded research (i.e. NIH/NCI R01 grants). The individual projects are not required to be translational in nature, but should have specific aims whose results will support future translational projects.

The Specific Aims of the Developmental Research Program are:

  1. Encourage and solicit innovative laboratory, population, and clinical study proposals with a high probability for translational impact on GI cancers.
  2. Using the expertise of our Executive Committee and External Advisory Committee, encourage and support interdisciplinary collaboration in GI cancer translational research.
  3. Generate new hypotheses that can be tested in larger-scale research projects or clinical trials that can impact GI cancers.
  4. Oversee the successful scientific evaluation and overall administration of the program.

Awards are determined through a three-tier review process. For more information on the program and how to apply, contact Kim Nicolini, Research Administrator, at knicolini@azcc.arizona.edu 

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Career Development

Program Director: Mark Nelson, PhD

The translational goal of the Career Development Program is the recruitment and development of scientists to become independent translational investigators in gastrointestinal cancer research.

The University of Arizona, Arizona Cancer Center GI SPORE recognizes the need for hypothesis-based translational research as key to development of effective strategies for treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal cancer.  Thus the recruitment and development of investigators with promise is clearly critical.  The Career Development Program is charged with recruiting and supporting talented investigators interested in focusing on GI cancer translational research. These could either be promising new investigators or established investigators wishing to redirect their research focus to translational research in GI cancer.

The Specific Aims of the Career Development Program are as follows:

  1. Recruit and train new investigators to enable them to become highly skilled translational investigators in gastrointestinal cancer.
  2. Redirect individuals who already have shown considerable scientific promise into gastrointestinal cancer research.
  3. Provide research expertise and mentorship that will enhance the ability of awardees to conduct innovative translational science that will directly impact the understanding and treatment of GI cancers.
  4. Provide career enrichment activities such as grant writing skills, oral and poster presentation skills, and publication preparation
  5. Facilitate collaborative research opportunities amongst program faculty as well as InterSPORE opportunities and other collaborative networks.

The Career Development Program will support the development of both basic scientists and clinicians in GI translational research and help allow their research efforts to impact human GI cancers in the foreseeable future.

Awards are determined through a three-tier review process. For more information on the program, contact Kim Nicolini, Research Administrator, a knicolin@email.arionza.edu

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Arizona Cancer Center SPORE in GI Cancer Research Advocacy Program (RAP)


What is the GI SPORE RAP?

The University of Arizona Cancer Center Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Gastrointestinal (GI) Cancer is one of four GI SPORE research programs funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The GI SPORE is charged to translate gastrointestinal cancer research into better diagnosis, care, treatment, and prevention. The immediate goal of the UA Cancer Center GI SPORE is to prevent and cure cancers of the colon, esophagus and pancreas through studies in prevention, genetics and therapeutics.

The GI SPORE Research Advocacy Program (RAP) brings patient perspectives into SPORE research to help scientists focus on results and move the science more effectively from the lab to the clinic. RAP helps identify barriers that block advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment and helps take action to resolve issues.

Who are SPORE research advocates?

GI SPORE research advocates are individuals with a personal history or relationship with cancer, especially (but not exclusive to) cancers of the colon, esophagus and pancreas. Patient advocates include cancer survivors, caregivers, and those at risk who are willing to make a personal commitment to work directly with GI SPORE cancer researchers to help bring the best science to those who are affected by GI cancers.

What do SPORE research advocates do?

GI SPORE research advocates can be active in many ways:

  • Participate in local SPORE meetings
  • Monthly research meetings
  • Annual retreats
  • Scientific review panels
  • Hold education sessions for patients and the public
  • Hold education sessions for scientists and staff
  • Participate in clinical trial development
  • Review informed consent forms
  • Develop patient-oriented tools for SPORE clinical trials
  • Distribute trial information to communities
  • Review tissue collection and follow-up procedures
  • Give input on surveys and other tools in research
  • Facilitate collaborations between the Arizona Cancer Center GI SPORE investigators, institutions, companies, and government entities

RAP Contact Information: For more information on the University of Arizona Cancer Center GI SPORE RAP program, contact:
Kim Nicolini, Research Administrator
SPORE in GI Cancers
University of Arizona Cancer Center
1515 N Campbell Ave.
Tucson, AZ  85724
Phone: 520-626-6722
Fax: 520-626-5348
Email: knicolin@email.arizona.edu

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Supplement Descriptions

The GI SPORE has two funded supplements to the parent grant.

Supplement 1: Exploring the Relationship Between Arsenic and Cancer

Supplement 2: Predictive Biomarkers for Esophageal Adenocarcinoma in Patients with Barrett's Esophagus 

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Faculty Listings

The following is a list of all GI Spore faculty members, including physicians and researchers. For more information on a specific member, please click on Member Directory to be redirected to a searchable database for the member's biography and research activities.

Investigator               

Organization/Department                            

Thompson-Carino, Patricia A., PhD

University of Arizona
Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology

Balandandayuthapani, Veera, PhD

University of Texas

Department of Biostatistics

Barrett, Michael, PhD

Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)

Clinical Translational Research Division

Barton, Jennifer, PhD

University of Arizona

Department of Biomedical Engineering

Bhattacharyya, Achyut K., MD

University of Arizona
Department of Pathology

Bommireddy, Ramireddy, PhD

University of Arizona Cancer Center

Boros, Laszlo G, MD

UCLA

Department of Pediatrics

Bremner, Ross, MD

St Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

Center for Thoracic Disease

Broom, Bradley, PhD

University of Texas

Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

Dragovich, Tomislav, MD, PhD

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center

Erdman, Steven, MD

Nationwide Children’s Hospital

Department of Clinical Pediatrics

Gerner, Eugene W, PhD

University of Arizona

Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

Hamilton, Stanley, MD

University of Texas,
Department of Pathology

Han, Haiyong, PhD

Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)

Clinical Translational Research Division

Ignatenko, Natalia, PhD

University of Arizona

Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

Inge, Landon, PhD

St Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

Center for Thoracic Disease

Kopetz, Scott, MD, PhD

University of Texas,

Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical Oncology

Krouse, Robert, MD

University of Arizona

Department of Surgery

Lance, M. Peter, MD

University of Arizona
Department of Medicine

Meuillet, Emmanuelle, PhD

University of Arizona

Department of Nutrition

Morris, Jeffrey, PhD

University of Texas

Department of Biostatistics

Musher, Benjamin, MD

Baylor College of Medicine

Department of Medicine

Nelson, Mark A., PhD

University of Arizona
Department of Pathology

Nfonsam, Valentine, MD

University of Arizona

Department of Surgery

Patel, Charmi, MD

University of Arizona
Department of Pathology

Patel, Hitendra, MD

University of Arizona

Department of Medicine

Ramanathan, Ramesh, MD

Scottsdale Clinical Research Institute

GI Oncology Program

Roe, Denise, DrPH

University of Arizona

Department of Biostatistics

Von Hoff, Daniel D., MD, FACP

Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)
Clinical Translational Research Division

Wang, Timothy C., MD

Columbia University

Department of Medicine

Zhang, Wei, PhD

University of Texas

Cancer Genomics Core Laboratory

GI SPORE Collaborators

Boardman, Lisa

Mayo Clinic Rochester

Burke, Carol

Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland, John

Scripps Institute Florida

Coffey, Robert

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Eibl, Guido

UCLA

Jacob, Jeffrey

Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals

Marcet, Jorge

University of South Florida

Markowitz, Sanford

Case Western University

Petersen, Gloria

Mayo Clinic Rochester

Shapiro, David

Intercept Pharmaceuticals

Washington, Kay

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Witte, Russell

University of Arizona

GI SPORE External Advisory Committee

Bray, Travis

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Foundation

Cleveland, John

Scripps Institute Florida

Dubbs, Robert

Thomas Jefferson University Kimmel Cancer Center

Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

University of Cambridge

Hirshberg, Agi

Hirshberg Foundation

Kays, Kay

Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

Maley, Carlo C.

University of California San Francisco

Shyr, Yu

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Tempero, Margaret

UCSF

 

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